Posted by: Isaac Bruce | June 22, 2011

Face 2 Face with Poverty

In Africa or even Ghana, where so many social and economic forms exist, it is quite difficult to generalize on each of these patterns. The main factors which tags a nation as developing still remains in some place who have seen little or no change in their lives. So, my visits to the farmers are coming up more frequently than I initially anticipated. Yesterday 21st June, is about the fifth time of visiting and interviewing farmers on general issues affecting the agricultural market in Ghana.

My visit today started with talking with organizations in these communities who have been serving farmers over the past years. Every discussion and interview with these ‘rural players’ presents a unique knowledge and experience on what exactly the market is about and its prospects in the future. Most importantly, my visit to one of the villages called Agodzo near kom in the Eastern region lead me to a young man named Frederick Otoo who is a brother of a reseller to the company I am working with. From the way he was answering questions, I became curious to engage him with other personal questions. He gladly gave me his name as mentioned and told me he is a farmer as well.

By the way, Frederick is a seventeen year old boy and a junior high school dropout due to financial support. He now farms about a 2 acre land (given to him by his grandfather), rears snails and weaves baskets alongside. Frederick was lead to start these business ventures because despite the poor financial background of the parents, he did not perform well during his final junior high school examination (Basic Education Certificate Examination B.E.C.E) in 2009. As determined and focused (something you rarely find some people with the means) as he is, he has decided to do a remedial of the exams by raising money on his own. But the question is how far can he go considering the current situation he finds himself? He enlisted the problems as lack of textbooks for his study, his community is still cut off from the electricity grid, sometimes gets tired from the day’s making him unable to revise.

Apart from what I will be able to help Frederick with in the coming weeks, I ultimately thought of you, my avid readers of the enormous support you will be able to contribute in Frederick’s life. You are my sole motivation for this blog post. In the coming weeks, I will be getting books (used & unused books) from Accra for him. The main objective is to give him the requisite tools to pass his examination that he wants to retake early next year. He also pointed out he wants to be a business entrepreneur, which in my view he has managed to prove its worth. I am counting on your response to see Frederick join his friends at least at another level back in school.

Frederick lamented the problem as a vicious cycle in the community; nevertheless as far we know it might be for a lot more communities still not having access to quality education and the absence of a meaningful economic activity. However, I believe his situation is a classic case of persistence and hope. I believe Frederick deserves an opportunity to end his family’s vicious cycle of poverty by putting him back to school. Frederick feeds Ghana with his cassava and snails but perhaps he needs a different kind of food from the few people reading this blog- education.

Please give him a try by replying, calling (+233274139818) or emailing (isaac.bruce5@gmail.com) to the address below to get more information and access to Frederick. Thank You

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Responses

  1. Thanks all those who have expressed their support and even concern about Frederick’s situation. I have been able to get used books from Accra which i will be sending to him this week. I have 5 more weeks to be here, so please let me know if you are still interested to help Frederick go back to school in any way.

  2. interesting stuff going on here. i am highly impressed! good observations and comparisons………. love it


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